Tag Archives: American English

Strange…or Accurate? An American’s Take on British English

Speaking and understanding English is a complicated thing, whether it’s your mother tongue or an adopted language. From Great Britain to the United States and Australia to Scotland, English is spoken around the world as a primary and as a second language for many people looking to advance personally or professionally. Furthermore, the British are […]


Britishisms in America

According to an article from BBC News, British English words and phrases are creeping in to American English. Ben Yagoda, Professor of English at the University of Delaware, has even set up a blog to track them. He’s so far found around 150, from skint to cheers and loo to mate. According to an associate […]


10 British insults

There are a lot of similarities between American English and British English. There are also a lot of differences, and these are a lot more fun! BBC America is helping smooth the linguistic pathway, with its list of “10 Stinging British Insults”, only one of which is reproduced below as the rest are NSFW. Minger […]


How Americans are changing the sound of English

An interesting article in Slate busts the myth that the American accent is becoming homogenized. They take as an example the changes happening in accents around the Great Lakes – known to linguists as the Northern Cities Shift (NCS). This is seen as perhaps being the biggest change for centuries in English pronunciation. And when […]


American expressions Brits don’t understand

Whilst visiting the states last month, I discovered there’s a lot of things Americans don’t understand about the British (one being the difference between England, Britain and the UK). But there’s also a lot the British don’t understand about Americans. BBC America has compiled a list of five American expressions Brits don’t understand. Here are […]


How Americans speak

Back in 1962, Fred Cassidy was named chief editor of an American dialect dictionary project. He envisioned the Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE) would be complete by 1976; the first volume was not published until 1985, and covered A to C. The final volume, V, is published in March. DARE stands alone as the […]