Tag Archives: learn spanish

Catalonian Crisis: Is Language the Root of Nationality?

The story of Catalonia is a complicated one, but it is one heck of a fascinating linguistic phenomenon. Catalan plays a fundamental role in the region’s debate for independence, serving not only as fuel for the opposition but as the highest expression of identity. Before we dive into cultural debates, I want to make it(…)


Top Tips to Keep Your Peruvian Travels Safe

So you’re headed to Peru. Your friends are jealous, your family may be a little worried for no reason, and you could not possibly be more excited. Now I’m sure you’ve created packing lists, itineraries of things to see, and there must be a bevy of stuff you want to eat and drink while you’re(…)


When Cervantes Roamed the Earth: The King of Spanish Literature

So far in our look at some of our most famous language maestros, we have unfairly concentrated on those whose native language was English. This week we intend to redress that balance by looking at the master of Spanish literature, Miguel de Cervantes. Cervantes has long been considered the greatest writer in the Spanish language,(…)


The 6 Hardest Things about Learning Spanish

  Rounding out to some 400 million people worldwide, Spanish is the second-largest language in the world in terms of native speakers (after Mandarin Chinese). Native Spanish speakers, who simply acquire the language effortlessly at a young age, have it easy. For the rest of us, however, learning Spanish involves a great deal of studying(…)


Top Dialects of the Spanish Language

Spanish is the language with the second-most native speakers in the world, with a whopping 450 million who speak Spanish as their first language. In addition to that number, there are hundreds of millions more who speak Spanish as a non-native language. In addition to having a large population of native speakers, Spanish is widespread(…)


Language switching

Have you ever wondered how bilingual people can switch between languages so easily? According to new research, it seems they have separate “sound systems”. The study, at the University of Arizona, looked at 32 Spanish-English bilinguals. It tested them on some ‘rare’ words in Spanish and English, finding that if participants heard the words in(…)