Category Archives: quirk

How to Turn Your Favourite Hobbies Into Language-Learning Experiences

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When people speak about learning languages as an adult vs. learning as a child, it’s very common to hear that children are like sponges who absorb everything you toss their way. While it’s true that adults have to work harder in order to acquire new skills, we have two big advantages over children that people(…)


7 Spanish Proverbs And What They Teach Us About Spanish-Speaking Cultures

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Phrases like “A bad workman always blames his tools” and “All that glitters is not gold” have two things in common. First, they have been consistently used across several English-speaking generations. And second, not many of us know where they come from. Now that you’ve finally decided to study Spanish, what about doing things differently(…)


The Viral Polyglot Reporter and Other Multilingual Celebrities

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On Tuesday 22nd February, a video of an Associated Press journalist became globally viral while covering the conflict between Ukraine and Russia from Kyiv, which he has presented in no less than six different languages. Today, we will tell you how Crowther became an Internet sensation overnight and we’ll take a look at other multilingual(…)


The Spookiest Ghosts That Will Haunt Your Dreams This Halloween

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The spookiest time of the year is upon us once again, and what better way to celebrate Halloween than by telling some ghost stories? While this macabre date has its roots in Celtic and Pagan festivities, today most countries have some kind of celebration on October 31. Different countries and regions have their own folk(…)


Uniquely Canadian French Idioms

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Maybe you’ve heard that Canada officially has two languages: English and French, and that the majority of its residents are able to speak both fluently. While the French language in Canada and Francophone culture does have quite a bit of depth to it, English is still trumping French on the Canadian curling rink. Interestingly enough,(…)


11 Idioms to Add Color to Your French!

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Like English (and many other languages), French is littered with idioms, many of them referring to animals, religion, and parts of the body. A lot of French expressions have English equivalents and a few can even be translated word for word, but others are a bit further away from the English and some appear to(…)


Stop Saying That! Expressions You Need to Stop Getting Wrong

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I am a stickler for correct grammar. I recognize the evolving nature of language and that everyone has their own dialects, slang words, and vernaculars, but if I have to spend five minutes longer than usual deciphering something you’ve written because you refuse to use commas, you will suffer my wrath. As much as I(…)


Japanese slang terms used in daily life (Part I)

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The Japanese language can seem very rigid and formal. It is steeped in tradition and strict rules of acknowledgment of social status. These aspects of speaking Japanese can be lost on native English speakers who are not used to these seemingly rigid and unbending codes of linguistic conduct. But one would be very surprised to(…)


3 Classic Comedy TV Shows From Mexico You Can’t Miss

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Classic Mexican television shows are just as popular today as they were in decades past. Shot in low-quality color, physical comedy reigned supreme, and laughter at every twist and turn of the plot was–and is–all but guaranteed. Don’t let the fact that these shows were produced in Mexico lead you to believe that their popularity(…)


5 Untranslatable Korean Idioms and Proverbs

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If there was a computer translation application that had the ability to enter in and adjust language for its cultural differences, it would be much easier to properly translate the Korean idiom of, “A dog with feces scolds a dog with husks of grain“ (똥묻은개가겨묻은개나무란다). If this were the case, the well-known Korean idiom would(…)