Tag Archives: English lessons

Drag Vocab and How You’re Already Using It

If you’re the kind of person who is forever on social media, your vocabulary probably changes on a fairly rapid basis. Squad goals, on fleek, and savage we might not use all that regularly today, for example because these words have already or are falling out of favor; though we’re still dead at the thought(…)


8 Popular Phrases You Probably Didn’t Know Were Coined by Shakespeare

The Bard may be long gone but his influence on the English language persists hundreds of years after he penned his last work. William Shakespeare created new words and phrases all the time for his plays and poetry, and a lot of them surprisingly still persist today. When we’re not making use of his plot(…)


The English Effect

The British Council is currently celebrating the English language, as spoken both in the UK and overseas. One in seven of the world’s population are learning English – that’s over 1.5 billion people! The British Council’s video ‘English and me’ shows people from all over the world saying what the English language means to them.(…)


Games For Practice

Learning new vocabulary is essential to improving your language skills. One way to improve is through online quizzes and games. Word Dynamo, which is linked with Dictionary.com, has a number of games for you to try at different grade levels, for different subjects and for test prep. It also offers tests in Latin and Spanish!(…)


Words we should revive

Have you ever thought “Hey. What’s the word for freshly melted snow? No… not slush.” Well, it’s snowbroth! Yep, according to this Buzzfeed article, snowbroth dates from the 1590s and simply means “freshly melted snow”. Not got enough uses for snowbroth? What about snoutfair? It means a good looking person. As in “Ryan Gosling’s a(…)


Grammar issues

Many people complain that English is difficult to grasp because of its grammar. Helpfully, The Week has written a list of seven grammar rules you really should pay attention to, particularly if you’re writing for public consumption. 2. Bad parallelism This issue comes up most often in lists, for example: My friend made salsa, guacamole,(…)


Words of the year.. from other countries

Yep, it’s not just the Merriam-Webster people who get to decide on a word of the year – other countries have their own version. My favourite from this round-up by Mental Floss is: 8. Ogooglebar, Swedish Instead of picking one word of the year, the Swedes, in their egalitarian way, make a list of all(…)


Moscow has new English-language radio station

Russia is apparently not a very friendly place for the non-Russian speaker. All signs are in Cyrillic with no helpful English translation, although English is the most-spoken foreign language by its population. This may change though, with the launch of Moscow’s first 24 hour English language radio station. The station will mostly play international music,(…)


Omnishambles named Word of the Year

It seems to get earlier every year… The Oxford English Dictionary has named its word of the year – omnishambles. Its meaning is “a situation which is shambolic from every possible angle” and derives from a British TV show called The Thick of It. Other shortlisted words include: Eurogeddon Games maker Mobot Second screening Fiona(…)


Is texting ruining the English language?

Do you know your LOL from your TMI or OMG? Are these acronyms creeping in to your everyday English – outside of texting? This interesting infographic shows some staggering stats about texting, including that 8 TRILLION texts were sent in 2011. It also asks the questions “is texting ruining the English language?” and “is texting(…)