Tag Archives: language evolution

The Top 9 Soon-To-Be Extinct Words of 2017

A few weeks ago, we wrote about words that have been added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary for 2017 and what made those words worthy to be included into the official lexicon of our language. While looking at the new words, we also came across words that have been deleted in 2017, and the reasons why. As intriguing(…)


Giving Life to Language: How New Words Are Created

Not yet halfway through the year and already Webster’s has added a 1,000 new words to their dictionary. Though the old man Noah Webster himself might have been stymied by words like humblebrag, photobomb and listicle, the lexicographers at Merriam-Webster are encouraging the unstoppable language revolution. It’s true that none of these words are necessarily(…)


Population Boom, Language Bust: Homogenization at Work

Since modern science has extended life spans and lowered infant and child mortality rates, world population has been increasing at an exponential rate leading to major changes in human migration. This migration has created larger and larger populous centers that has resulted in cultural homogenization and the dominance of fewer languages (ahem, English). Okay, that’s(…)


What Happened with Slang in 2016?

One of the great side effects of the massive breath of the English language is the slang to which it has given birth. As English has become the language of the world, the slang works its way into cultures and countries everywhere. Cool, kinky, crazy slang words of course. Hang out, chill out, freak out(…)


Childhood Songs of Christmas Past

‘Tis the season to be jolly… Well no. Actually it’s not really. The commercial demonisation of what for some is a religious event and for others is a midwinter’s family get together drags the beginning of the celebration of Christmas earlier and earlier each year. In fact, we could have posted this back in August(…)


Hep to the Step, Hep to the Lingo: What is Jive?

Language can define a generation; just look at the effect the internet, with sites like Tumblr, Vine, and Reddit, has had on the way we speak today. Groovy vernacular was common in the 60s, while the 80s was rad,  perhaps even tubular. What about the age of jazz during the 30s and the 40s? Whaddya(…)


The Next Steps for Our Ever-Evolving English

Whilst this joke is so old that it isn’t at all relative anymore, the idea that the English language might subtly adopt changes until it looks like something entirely different isn’t a new one. Linguists and us regular folk have been bemoaning the encroachment of lols into our everyday language for just about as long(…)


Brain evolution led to tool-making and language skills

Researchers believe that stone-age humans developed language skills around the same as tool-making skills, according to a report in the Guardian. Both activities require complex thought and it is believed the evolution of tool-making skills helped develop the brain enough to use language. From the article: Brain scans of modern stone-tool makers show that key(…)